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Ten Reasons Why Suicidal Tendencies Rule, Yo!

Pledge your allegiance to the godfathers of crossover

Earlier today we announced the crossover heroes Suicidal Tendencies as the latest band to be performing at the Metal Hammer Golden Gods. Naturally the entire Hammer office has been cranking Join The Army at full blast and wearing bandanas in celebration of one of the greatest bunch of skaters to ever form a band. But what makes us run around like idiots at the mere thought of an ST live show? Allow us to enlighten you...

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HARDCORE ROOTS

Originally formed in Venice, Los Angeles, in 1981, Suicidal Tendencies were one of the most distinctive and revered bands to emerge from the early years of hardcore. Their self-titled debut of 1983 is widely acknowledged as a stone cold classic, with songs like I Shot The Devil, Memories Of Tomorrow and Fascist Pig adding muscle and grit to the punk rock formula, not to mention a whole ton of badass Californian attitude and angst. 32 years later, it still fucking slays.

INSTITUTIONALIZED

Still arguably the most famous of all Suicidal Tendencies tunes, Institutionalized was the centrepiece of that 1983 debut; a sustained, bug-eyed tirade by frontman Mike Muir about the enervating minutiae of teenage life and subsequent battles with parents and other authority figures. The original version cannot be topped, but it’s well worth checking out Body Count’s hilarious revamp of the song from last year’s Manslaughter album. Oh, and Fred Durst may have nicked a lyric or two from Institutionalized over the years too. Pepsi, anyone?

CYCO MIKO

Mike Muir. What a guy. Suicidal Tendencies’ indestructible frontman has been leading the ST charge, sporting a bandana and bellowing like a man possessed for well over three decades. His voice is unique, his lyrical perspective reliably distinctive and astute and his open-minded approach to music, whether expressed through his main band or via any number of notable side-projects, is commendable in a subgenre that can often be a little myopic. Plus, Mike is a super nice guy. Which isn’t always the way, is it?

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