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The Best New Rock Album Releases This Week

Bon Jovi, Glenn Hughes, Voodoo Vegas and more: the best new rock releases you can check out this week

Bon Jovi - This House Is Not For Sale

"It should come as no surprise that This House Is Not For Sale is crammed with Bud Light anthems squarely aimed at soundtracking the leaving montages on reality TV contests. But surely that’s always been their charm – the unashamed appropriation of mainstream pop married to all-American everyman lyrics like Labor Of Love’s ‘If love is a fire, I’ll go down in those flames.’" Read the full review here.

Glenn Hughes - Resonate

"Glenn Hughes wrote his first solo album in eight years during therapy for knee replacement surgery. Titled Resonate, it’s the former Trapeze/Deep Purple/Black Sabbath singer’s 13th album under his own name. 'I knew as I went into this album that it would be my return to rock,' says Hughes, conscious of his legacy upon the world of funk, 'so in some ways it wrote itself.'" Read a full track-by-track guide to the album here.

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Voodoo Vegas - Freak Show Candy Floss

"This second album from Bournemouth’s Voodoo Vegas is a frustrating beast. There are some sterling moments of high-energy rock’n’roll to found here, not least the galloping jig of Long Time Gone, the black humour of Killing Joke and heavy grinding strut of closer Walk Away." Read the full review here.

Tad - Reissues

"When grunge first kicked in back in the late 80s, it always felt like Tad were going to be its main players, with Nirvana’s Kurt Cobain following meekly like Stan to Tad Doyle’s Ollie. It’s an understandable reaction given the power of their 1989 debut God’s Balls, whose opener Behemoth barrels and staggers raucously through the barroom doors like the disinterred, raging corpse of 70s metal with fresh electrodes attached." Read the full review here.

Crowded House - 30th Anniversary Reissues

"The shades, tints and tones of 1993’s Together Alone mark it out as one the decade’s most accomplished pop statements; directness (Distant Sun), introspection (Private Universe) and playfulness (Pineapple Head) converge in confident grandeur. Arguably, main man Neil Finn felt the job had been done and it was time to move on to other goals." Read the full review here.


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