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The 50 greatest Iron Maiden songs of all time

Because we like to torture ourselves here at Hammer, we decided to do something special to commemorate Maiden’s return to the UK. So: the 50 greatest ever Maiden tracks - by fans, for fans...

Picked by a panel of bands, readers, Hammer staff and Steve Harris himself, we are officially counting down the 50 greatest Iron Maiden songs of all time. No era was off-limits. No song was ineligible. By Maiden fans. For Maiden fans. Let’s get to it…


50) EMPIRE OF THE CLOUDS (THE BOOK OF SOULS, 2015)

As if writing a concept track about the doomed R101 airship wasn’t grand enough, Bruce Dickinson also opted to make this epic closer from 2015’s double-album Maiden’s longest song ever. Clocking in at 18 minutes, it’s a triumphant, progressive masterpiece.

49) BE QUICK OR BE DEAD (FEAR OF THE DARK, 1992)

The opening track to Maiden’s most underrated album is an absolute ripper, coming screaming out of the gates with a snapping riff straddled by Bruce wailing away like a banshee with her tits caught in a car door.

48) MAN ON THE EDGE (THE X FACTOR, 1995)

There are some absolute gems hidden away in the Blaze Bayley albums, not least this pacy, urgent and claustrophobic single from the icons’ 10th studio album. Based on the Michael Douglas-goes-batshit classic Falling Down, it showed they still had fangs.

47) ALEXANDER THE GREAT (SOMEWHERE IN TIME, 1986)

Nicko has remarked that he’d like the band to play this live one day – and you can hear why. Built around a suitably brooding and militaristic drumbeat that leads into a stirring chorus, ATG also manages to make ‘Macedonia’ sound metal.

46) MONTSÉGUR (DANCE OF DEATH, 2003)

How this 100%, iron-clad rager got left off the Dance Of Death-era setlists we’ll never know. A thunderous, battle-ready banger, Montségur is the fastest track Maiden have penned since Bruce’s return – and it absolutely crushes.

45) TAILGUNNER (NO PRAYER FOR THE DYING, 1990)

A highlight of Maiden’s no-strings-attached but generally misfiring No Prayer For The Dying opus, Tailgunner is a simplistic, fun and pacy spiritual soulmate to Aces High. Admit it, you’re air-machine-gunning as you read this.

44) WHERE EAGLES DARE (PIECE OF MIND, 1983)

Band pick! “The first Maiden song I ever heard. I bought Piece Of Mind, and when Where Eagles Dare came in, it just hooked me. That drum fill alone was more than enough. What an album opener!”

BRANN DAILOR, MASTODON

43) SIGN OF THE CROSS (THE X FACTOR, 1995)

How would Maiden officially kick off the Blaze era following Bruce’s departure? With a dark and lumbering 11-minute monster, that’s how. Rolling along on a sinister, rumbling bassline, it gets bonus metal points for those sweet sinister monk chants.

42) THE LONGEST DAY (A MATTER OF LIFE AND DEATH, 2006)

Hammer pick! “Lots of Maiden songs gives me goosebumps, but the first time I heard this gem from A Matter Of Life And Death, I nearly fell off my chair. Best played at excruciating volume, it’s a dark and devastating paean to the horrors of D-Day.”

DOM LAWSON, STAFF WRITER

41) COMING HOME (THE FINAL FRONTIER, 2010)

One of Maiden’s most earnest and uplifting tracks ever, Coming Home perfectly encapsulates the feeling of touching back down on home turf after a long time away. The ultimate, lighters-up, arms-loft heavy metal anthem.

40) SEVENTH SON OF A SEVENTH SON (SEVENTH SON OF A SEVENTH SON, 1988)

Hammer pick! “That chorus, man. Even though the song is bloody long, and proggy as fuck, it still gallops along like only Maiden can do. An open-armed anthem, with Bruce’s stadium-sized ‘Woooah’s powering the band onward into the breach.”

LUKE MORTON, ONLINE EDITOR

39) STRANGER IN A STRANGE LAND (SOMEWHERE IN TIME, 1986)

Hammer pick! “That opening, Priest-like bassline will echo around your skull for a lifetime. This may not be Maiden at their most immediate, but its lush, proggy wash and funky, bubbling groove make for an immersive, sci-fi travelogue.”

JONATHAN SELZER, REVIEWS/SUBTERRANEA EDITOR

38) BRING YOUR DAUGHTER… TO THE SLAUGHTER (NO PRAYER FOR THE DYING, 1990)

Band pick! “It was the first Maiden song I heard, when they played it on Top Of The Pops. Pop and dance was big at that point, and all of a sudden there were these dudes with guitars and super-long hair, yelling about slaughtering daughters. It was pretty eye-opening!”

MATT TUCK, BULLET FOR MY VALENTINE

37) FLIGHT OF ICARUS (PIECE OF MIND, 1983)

Band pick! “It gives me goosebumps. There are maybe 10 songs that you hear in your whole life that when you hear the intro, you just think, ‘What the fuck is this?!’ That was Flight Of Icarus for me.”

JOAKIM BRODÉN, SABATON

36) HEAVEN CAN WAIT (SOMEWHERE IN TIME, 1986)

A particular highlight of Maiden’s synth-straddling ’86 knockout, Heaven Can Wait switches up pace and tone so much over seven breathless minutes that it’s hard to keep up. Plus, dem woahs halfway through… yeah, you know the ones.

35) WHEN THE WILD WIND BLOWS (THE FINAL FRONTIER, 2010)

Consolidating the fact that Maiden were taking an increasingly latitudinous approach to their songwriting in this most fruitful of second golden ages, When The Wild Wind Blows is a gorgeous, meandering denouement to an album absolutely stacked with great ideas.

34) THE CLAIRVOYANT (SEVENTH SON OF A SEVENTH SON, 1988)

Practically bursting at the seams with outlandish mischief, The Clairvoyant glides along a gleaming, multilayered verse before melting into a thunderous, 4/4 chorus that was tailor-made for pogoing festival crowds. Also featuring Bruce Dickinson at his prophetic best.

33) REVELATIONS (PIECE OF MIND, 1983)

An understated but beautifully orchestrated number, Revelations is built on a determined, plodding riff sprinkled with lurid imagery and impacted by a curiously melancholic midsection. Truly, a song fit to present to the Gods themselves.

32) NO MORE LIES (DANCE OF DEATH, 2003)

While Dance Of Death was a little top-heavy, when it slammed, it slammed hard, and rarely more than with this anthemic ditty. A live staple for the tour that followed, No More Lies has held up as one of Maiden’s finest modern songs.

31) PROWLER (IRON MAIDEN, 1980)

The song that started it all. A frantic, punked-up screamer, Prowler briefly dabbles in the kind of twin harmonic gorgeousness and guitar-duelling fun and games that came to signify Maiden’s career, but is fundamentally all about speed and precision. A bullseye.

30) GHOST OF THE NAVIGATOR (BRAVE NEW WORLD, 2000)

A spooky, nautical voyage from Maiden’s unstoppable comeback album with Bruce back in the fold, this is Maiden at their eeriest, with lyrics fit to fill a horror novel wrapped in a tense, pounding riff. Worth getting your swimmies on for.

29) RIME OF THE ANCIENT MARINER (POWERSLAVE, 1984)

Band pick! “…Ancient Mariner is so epic! It’s that breakdown section in the middle, that kind of cool bass arpeggio thing. It’s very eerie and mysterious, and then the way it builds up… it’s just massive when it finally hits you again. I just love that approach to songwriting.”

MYLES KENNEDY, ALTER BRIDGE

28) KILLERS (KILLERS, 1981)

Hammer pick! “I first heard this around the time I was getting into bass. There’s something so great about how it all locks in together, the bass and drums driving it all and the guitars smashing the melodies over the top. Classic Maiden!”

LEWIS SOMERSCALES, ART EDITOR

27) MOONCHILD (SEVENTH SON OF A SEVENTH SON, 1988)

Hammer pick! “Loosely based on the Aleister Crowley novel, this occult epic bristles with primal screams and massively creepy lyrics about ritual infant murder. The perfect balance of Maiden’s metal thunder and pure mysticism.”

ELEANOR GOODMAN, FEATURES EDITOR

26) THE CLANSMAN (VIRTUAL XI, 1998)

There may be Maiden fans for whom 1998’s _Virtual XI_ was a convenient entry point into the band’s world, but few would claim that it is one of the band’s strongest records. But then, of course, there is _The Clansman_. Steve Harris has often expressed his love for epic movies and cited film sound- tracks as an enduring source of inspiration, so there was a certain inevitability to the news that the Blaze Bayley- fronted Maiden had recorded a song inspired by Mel Gibson’s box-office triumph, Braveheart, the story of William Wallace, 13th-century Scottish warrior and kilt- sporting badass. The movie itself was undoubtedly overblown and historically suspect, but the essence of its message – the victory of the oppressed over their oppressors – was perfect for a heavy metal anthem.

While much of the rest of Virtual XI struggled to hold the attention (not least the overlong The Angel And The Gambler), The Clansman stood out as a Maiden classic, one of Blaze’s finest ever vocal performances and, more importantly, firm evidence that Steve Harris was still more than capable of writing songs that could compel an entire arena full of fans to bellow along with maximum enthusiasm. When Maiden hit the road in support of Virtual XI, the song was greeted like an old friend, as thousands roared “Freeeedoooooom!” and Blaze revelled in the moment. After the singer’s departure and the return of Bruce and Adrian Smith in 1999, Maiden were somewhat excused from having to perform Blaze-era songs, but The Clansman remained in the setlist for a good while and seemed to grow in power and allure when sung by everyone’s favourite airline pilot. The definitive version of the song can be found on 2002’s Rock In Rio live album, wherein Bruce injected fresh impetus into a song that sums up the band’s never-say-die spirit. The Clansman also seems oddly pertinent in today’s Trump-bothered world: ‘It’s a time wrought with fear/It’s a land wrought with change/If ancestors could _hear what is happening now/__They would turn in their graves/_ _They would all be ashamed/That the land of the free has been written in chains.’_

STEVE SAYS: “It’s a song I really loved playing live. I’d love to do that again. It’s a real rabble-rouser, I think. There’s a lot of different emotions in that song and it has all that singalong stuff. It’s a powerful song and a good choice!”

25) CHILDREN OF THE DAMNED (THE NUMBER OF THE BEAST, 1982)

Band pick! “I really love this song because it shows the sensitive side of Iron Maiden. That was their attempt to get pussy, and they pulled it off – although they probably didn’t get as much as Van Halen.”

MICHAEL STARR, STEEL PANTHER

24) AFRAID TO SHOOT STRANGERS (FEAR OF THE DARK, 1992)

An impassioned track detailing the plight of soldiers fed into relentless government war machines, Afraid To Shoot Strangers made a welcome return to their setlist in recent years.

23) MURDERS IN THE RUE MORGUE (KILLERS, 1981)

Band pick! “On many of the Iron Maiden shows that Mastodon was lucky enough to support, I happened to catch this song more than any other song they played. If you’re a fan of guitars, it’s hard not to love this song.”

TROY SANDERS, MASTODON

22) INFINITE DREAMS (SEVENTH SON OF A SEVENTH SON, 1988)

A gorgeous number from the absolutely stacked Seventh Son… album, Infinite Dreams ponders along musings of consciousness and the afterlife, bubbling away on a soft opening guitar line before reaching an almighty, urgent crescendo. Curiously, it hasn’t been played for decades.

21) IF ETERNITY SHOULD FAIL (THE BOOK OF SOULS, 2015)

Band pick! “It’s my favourite new Maiden song because it really brought me in on the latest record. It’s adventurous – I love the vocal melodies. The way it’s arranged is brilliant; it takes you on an adventure but you’re never bored of it. The vocal melodies are a little out there, and I think that’s cool.”

M SHADOWS, AVENGED SEVENFOLD

20) THE WICKER MAN (BRAVE NEW WORLD, 2000)

How do you inform the world that Bruce Dickinson and Adrian Smith’s returns to the Maiden fold are a success? By launching your new album with a fucking grenade of a track. One of Maiden’s all-time great opening songs.

19) RUN TO THE HILLS (THE NUMBER OF THE BEAST, 1982)

Band pick! “It’s a song that I have sung many times! I can hit all of the notes in that one, but I’m not comparing myself to Bruce – I’d never do that! It’s just a fucking great song, an all-time classic. I don’t want people to think of me as a weirdo who picked some obscure B-side, so I’m going with one of the greatest songs ever made.”

CRISTINA SCABBIA, LACUNA COIL

18) CAN I PLAY WITH MADNESS (SEVENTH SON OF A SEVENTH SON, 1988)

Hammer pick! “The first Maiden song I ever heard! The awesome video was doing the rounds on MTV and teenaged me was transfixed. Woe betide the ears of anyone standing near me when they launch into it live!”

VANESSA THORPE, PRODUCTION EDITOR

17) PHANTOM OF THE OPERA (IRON MAIDEN, 1980)

Band pick! “I first heard Phantom Of The Opera when that first Maiden album came out in 1980, and it was so different to anything else out there. The riffs, the arrangement, the cycles it goes through… I love it, man. It’s such a unique song, it’s my favourite by them.”

KIRK HAMMETT, METALLICA

16) POWERSLAVE (POWERSLAVE, 1984)

Adorned with the most spectacular artwork they had yet conceived, Iron Maiden’s fifth album was an imperious statement made by a band at the height of their powers and (shortly thereafter) popularity. Its title track may have been initially overshadowed by Rime Of The Ancient Mariner’s colossal girth, but Powerslave is the album’s true high point: epic, atmospheric, dramatic and heavier than an iron pyramid, it deftly nailed the ancient Egyptian vibes presented by Derek Riggs’ incredible artwork (“Into the abyss I’ll fall, the Eye of Horus!”) while introducing a newly refined sense of dynamics and, dare we say it, subtlety into Iron Maiden’s sound. According to Steve Harris, the song was assembled from several distinct ideas that Bruce Dickinson had been working on, and the end result is not just one of Bruce’s greatest ever songs, but one of Maiden’s most iconic anthems. As for Dave Murray’s mellifluous mid- song solo? Heavy metal has never been more joyously spinetingling.

STEVE SAYS: “Again, it’s a great song. Powerslave has become one of the great epics in the set over the years, and quite rightly so. Bruce was pleased as punch when he came up with that. It was three different ideas he had and I suggested he made one fantastic song instead of three different ones. It’s a very powerful song. When you think about it, we’ve got loads of epics now. That’s great. Powerslave is definitely up there with the best of them.”

15) THESE COLOURS DON’T RUN (A MATTER OF LIFE AND DEATH, 2006)

Whether it’s the triumphant call to arms of the track itself or the fact its title references the infamous Maiden vs Sharon Osbourne Ozzfest episode, there’s something that resonates deeply about this cut from the ace A Matter Of Life And Death album.

14) WRATHCHILD (KILLERS, 1981)

Band pick! “It’s like a picking a favourite child, but the first one that springs to mind is Wrathchild. The lyrics, the riffs, the drums… everything about that song. I think it speaks to all metal fans. If you don’t like Wrathchild, you’re not an Iron Maiden fan! The first record I ever bought was Killers. When I got that record, that song just spoke to me and it still does.”

JOEY JORDISON, VIMIC

13) THE NUMBER OF THE BEAST (THE NUMBER OF THE BEAST, 1982)

Band pick! “It’s got to be The Number Of The Beast, for sure. We were on at the same time as them at Graspop in Belgium, so we had a pretty small crowd. We went over to watch them afterwards, and when they played The Number Of The Beast it was awesome!”

AHREN STRINGER, THE AMITY AFFLICTION

12) THE RED AND THE BLACK (THE BOOK OF SOULS, 2015)

Were it not for Empire Of The Clouds hogging all the attention due to its maddening length and curious concept, The Book Of Souls would surely have been defined by this absolute stunner. A 13+ minute, emotionally driven voyage with some stunning three-pronged guitar work, this isn’t just one of Maiden’s modern triumphs, but an un-fuck-withable classic.

11) WASTED YEARS (SOMEWHERE IN TIME, 1986)

Band pick! “I love the guitar line in the beginning. It’s just super-triumphant, man. One of those songs where you can see people on horses galloping into the night, but it isn’t corny. How can you have this song that sounds like these guys riding into the homes of the natives and not make it sound corny? It’s so gratifying.”

BEN WEINMAN, THE DILLINGER ESCAPE PLAN

10) 2 MINUTES TO MIDNIGHT (POWERSLAVE, 1984)

Band pick! “It combines the very best of Maiden. There’s metal fury, technicality… it’s a big metal banger! It became this huge MTV hit despite never going anywhere near a major key, and it has one of the best ever Maiden riffs and choruses.”

TOM MORELLO, PROPHETS OF RAGE

9) BLOOD BROTHERS (BRAVE NEW WORLD, 2000)

Hammer pick! “As good as metal gets – an epic, swaying, emotionally charged masterpiece from an album that can go toe-to-toe with any of Maiden’s 80s classics. It proved beyond a shadow of a doubt that Maiden were back in business on a major level, and still stands as one of their all-time-best tracks.”

MERLIN ALDERSLADE, EDITOR

8) RUNNING FREE (IRON MAIDEN, 1980)

Band pick! “I remember watching the Live At Donington version as a kid. Bruce really revs up the crowd and they added cool new bits into the song. It’s just got so much energy. It’s such a gutsy track.”

JOEL O’KEEFFE, AIRBOURNE

7) FEAR OF THE DARK (FEAR OF THE DARK, 1992)

Fan pick! “It encapsulates everything about the band – the catchy riffs that the crowd can sing
along to, the energy that the band puts in… It’s gripping for nearly seven and a half minutes and the best live song in music!”

STUART ROSE

6) THE EVIL THAT MEN DO (SEVENTH SON OF A SEVENTH SON, 1988)

Band pick! “We’ve covered this one, and we had a really good time working through that song and trying to make it our own. And it’s collectively our favourite Iron Maiden song. The chorus
is really high and the lyrics are ridiculous… although I guess you could say that about any Maiden song! But what’s not to like?!”

WILL GOULD, CREEPER

5) ACES HIGH (POWERSLAVE, 1984)

Fan pick! “I have been a fan of this band since 1990, ever since they came to play my hometown of Warsaw, Poland, and it only recently struck me how great the onomatopoeic sounds created by the guitarists were. You can virtually hear the engines roar and the guns firing!”

MARCIN ZDYBICKI

4) IRON MAIDEN (IRON MAIDEN, 1980)

While there have been a couple of better songs produced in Maiden’s time together (more on that in a second), this is surely still the anthem that defines them. Perfectly melding the sparky punk attack that is spread across their first album with a heavy metal weight and sense of melody that would hint at things to come, there’s a reason Iron Maiden remains the one track to never get dropped from their sets. After all, what would Eddie do without it?

3) THE TROOPER (PIECE OF MIND, 1983)

Band pick! “It’s got to be The Trooper. That riff. I was never a massive Maiden fan when I was a kid – I was much more into heavier bands like Pantera – but I went back to them when I was a bit older and I just don’t think you can fuck with them or songs like this. It’s a classic – and really heavy!”

DANI WINTER-BATES, BURY TOMORROW

2) Paschendale (Dance Of Death, 2003)

War has always been a major thematic inspiration in metal, both as a metaphor for life’s struggles and to acknowledge the heroism of those who fought to preserve our freedoms. Maiden’s knack for vivid storytelling has never seemed more potent than when wrapped around a genuine historical event, and with that in mind, no Maiden songs exerts more emotional clout or unnerving intensity than _Paschendale_.The Battle Of Passchendaele (its correct Belgian spelling) took place in Belgium during WWI between July and November 1917. Allied forces were seeking to wrestle control of the city of Ypres from the German Empire and to block the German army’s supply lines. More than 400,000 British and German soldiers were slaughtered in one of the war’s most senseless and gruesome campaigns. Once again, Maiden have long exhibited a knack for summing up the brutality of conflict and Adrian Smith’s initial idea, to write a song about this most hideous of war stories, could hardly have been more fitting. What is truly extraordinary about the resulting song is how elegantly the guitarist’s monumental musical ideas meshed seamlessly with the bitter, bruised poetry of the lyrics, meticulously evoking the horror and futility of what took place on that battlefield: _‘In the smoke, in the mud and lead/Smell the fear and the feeling of dread/Soon be time to go over the wall/Rapid fire and the end of us all…’_ Iron Maiden’s musical progress in the 21st century has very much been about the expanding and harnessing of more overtly progressive ideals, resulting in longer songs, more elaborate arrangements and ever more absorbing lyrical conceits. When Dance Of Death hit the shops in September 2003, Paschendale seemed to represent the zenith of that approach. Structurally inspired, it’s a masterclass in goosebump-inducing dynamics, as it lurches from restrained, unsettling quiet to eruptions of power and volume, all driven along by Nicko McBrain’s thrillingly expressive drumming. An instant show-stopper when Maiden hit the road to promote that new album, Paschendale also gave Bruce an opportunity to throw himself bodily into conveying the true drama inherent in the song’s meaning and delivery. As Bruce sang, the band’s stage set seemed to morph into a hazy, bloodsoaked battlefield and, by no means for the first time, Iron Maiden’s legendarily spectacular live show seemed to transform into something beyond simple entertainment. Nostalgia may dictate that earlier Maiden songs are more regularly celebrated, but Paschendale stands as one of the band’s greatest ever creations.

STEVE SAYS: “Adrian came up with the idea for that one. I helped arrange and write and take it where I felt it needed to go. But yeah, it’s just a big, epic song. It was a very enjoyable song to play, but you had to concentrate! I was really happy with the way it came out. I’d like to play it again, for sure.”

1) Hallowed Be Thy Name (Number Of The Beast, 1982)

‘I’m waiting in my cold cell/ When the bell begins to chime…’

If writing immortal heavy metal anthems was easy, everyone would be doing it. Iron Maiden mastered the art of writing songs that every fan wants to scream along with early in their career, with instant crowd-pleasers like Running Free and Wrathchild swiftly entering the established metal canon. But it wasn’t until the band’s third album, their first with Bruce Dickinson and a record that would turn them into superstars, that the finishing touches were put to Steve Harris’s blueprint for the Maiden sound. The Number Of The Beast was full of definitive moments, from Run To The Hills’ chart-busting fury to Children Of The Damned’s dark melodrama, but it was the final track on the album that had the greatest and most enduring impact.

Superficially, Hallowed Be Thy Name is a song about a man facing execution and his thoughts as he awaits “the gallows pole”. An early example of the existential uncertainty that Steve Harris has since expressed regularly through his lyrics, the song is plainly a lot deeper in theme and thought than it first appears. The doomed man’s terror of the unknown, his regrets, his despair and, as the song draws to a close, some degree of acceptance and surrender to the void… well, let’s just say that Hallowed Be Thy Name is no Party Hard. In some ways it was an unexpectedly profound statement from a band that had certainly touched upon big ideas before, but never with the precision and poetry that Steve conjured for The Number Of The Beast’s explosive denouement.

While Hallowed’s lyrics are certainly powerful and memorable, they would not have had the same effect on the Maiden faithful and the wider metal world beyond had the music underpinning them not been up to scratch. Luckily for everyone, Steve’s singular vision enabled him to attain his creative goal of bringing thunderous, melodic heavy rock and adventurous, progressive song structures together. From its ominous, restrained intro, with its tolling bells and Dave Murray’s classical guitar, to the numerous gloriously fluid twists and turns, all drenched in Dave and Adrian Smith’s blissful harmonies, Hallowed Be Thy Name is an immaculate mini-symphony. Like all great stories, it has a beginning, a middle and an end, but like all great anthems, it has several unforgettable hooks, too.

Beyond bringing their breakthrough album to a stunning close, Hallowed Be Thy Name has also been an incredibly important live song for Maiden over the decades. Traditionally a set closer, it was almost obligatory at the band’s gigs from its first performance in 1982 until the conclusion of the Final Frontier tour at the O2 Arena in London in August 2011. Many fans were distraught when the song disappeared from subsequent setlists – although, it has to be said, Maiden have more than enough great songs to distract us with – and it’s no exaggeration to say that joy was unconfined when Hallowed… was reintroduced for the Book Of Souls tour. The song, and Bruce Dickinson’s high-energy demands for crowd participation during it, have become such a part of the Maiden live experience over the years that it must now be inconceivable that they will ever drop it from their sets again. Or, at least, we hope that’s the case.

Considering its length and its complexity, Hallowed Be Thy Name has defied the odds to become one of the greatest metal anthems of all time. It has been covered on countless occasions, most notably by Machine Head, Cradle Of Filth, Iced Earth and Dream Theater (the latter having performed The Number Of The Beast live in its entirety in 2002), but it is also one of very few songs that have transcended mere popularity and passed into the emotional fabric of the world of heavy music. No wonder that Steve Harris himself cites the song as his favourite Maiden song of all. Hallowed Be Thy Name sits at the top of this list because it’s not just Iron Maiden’s greatest ever song – it might just be the greatest heavy metal song of all time.

STEVE SAYS: “If someone who’d never heard Maiden before – someone from another planet or something – asked you about Maiden, what would you play them? I think Hallowed… is the one. It’s always nice to rest songs if you’ve been playing them forever, because when you bring them back it’s exciting again. It’s always enjoyable to play that one.”

Iron Maiden tour the UK in May


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