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Rage's Peavy Wagner shows us his, erm, bone collection

The frontman of the vintage German metal heroes bloody loves bones. No, really!

So, Peavy, how did this bone collection begin? you’ve got loads of them!

“I was four years old when first I started. My very first specimen was my pet golden hamster. Hamsters don’t last for very long, so I buried his body in my sandpit, then I got curious what his bones would look like so I dug him out again later. My father was a biology teacher and he kept animal skulls from his studies, so I knew what they looked like from an early age. I studied bone preparation for three years at a school in Germany, focusing on biological preparation and taxidermy.”

Did your interests in the internal workings of animals influence the skulls we see on most Rage album sleeves?

“The metal jaw skull was invented by my friend Joachim Luetke, who did our album covers over the years. I handcrafted the specimen for our latest album cover Seasons Of The Black; it’s made from silicone and resin from a cast of an 11th century Incan skull I have. In Incan society, the wealthier population had a fascination with long skulls; they bound the heads of their babies so they would grow into this elongated skull.”

Your collection looks a bit creepy…

“It’s not morbid to me! It’s always been a scientific interest of mine to see how all these creatures across the world look under their skin, to understand how their morphological elements have developed. You can show me a skull from any animal and I can tell you right away how the animal lived and what kind of space it covered. The bones can tell you everything about their previous owner.”

Where do you keep this enormous stash?

“It’s a private museum in my attic because it’s so big – it takes up more space than other people have for themselves! I’ve made sure it’s big enough to become a workplace where I can make my casts and prepare the bones.”


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